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“I’m Your Match!” SkyWest Flight Attendant Donates Kidney to Co-Worker

McKall Morris
Corporate Communications Coordinator

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Tonuah Trujillo

At age 16, Tonuah Trujillo, a Seattle-based SkyWest flight attendant, was diagnosed with a kidney disorder called IgA Nephropathy, which over time deteriorates the kidneys’ ability to filter waste out of blood. After an overnight trip last July landed her in the hospital for two days, Tonuah received the bad news – her kidney function had declined to 12 percent and she was going to need kidney dialysis or a transplant very soon.

“When I first got the news it was overwhelming, and we weren’t quite sure how to get the word out to all our friends and family,” Tonuah explained. “My boyfriend, Todd Hoover (a SkyWest captain based in Chicago) and a few other family members decided to start a Facebook page called ‘Team Tonuah.’ We felt it was the fastest way to get the word out about the situation and locate a possible kidney match.”

“Many of [Tonuah’s] friends and family lined up, filled out the paperwork and started the screening process,” Todd explained. “Unfortunately, we soon learned that the requirements to be a donor match can be hard to achieve, as one by one her loved ones were scratched off the list because they weren’t a match. While the list of volunteers was long, nobody could help.”

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Jeanette Perez

As Tonuah was preparing for dialysis due to the lack of donor matches, an incredible thing was taking place behind the scenes. For nearly three months, Jeanette Perez, a Chicago-based SkyWest flight attendant was taking numerous tests to see if she was a match for Tonuah.

“I became aware of Tonuah’s need via Todd’s Facebook page back in the fall. Long story short, I went through test after test to see if I was her match with the mentality of ‘if it’s meant to be it will,’” said Jeanette. “I was finally given the go at the end of January and told Tonuah the good news. She did not know I was testing. She didn’t even know who I was really – other than our one time meeting on a Christmas deadhead.”

On January 28, Tonuah received a life-changing text from an unknown phone number. It said, “Hey Tonuah! Good morning! It’s Jeanette – we met on Christmas… I brought you doughnuts. Heard you need a kidney. This is a weird text, so I’ll just spit it out. I’m your match. Really didn’t know any other way to put it out there. Fancy a chat sometime?”Kidney Donation 1

“At first I was in shock!” said Tonuah. “I had only met Jeanette one time, and it was just last Christmas. She was on my flight and I felt like we had an instant connection. Unbeknownst to me, she had already been in the testing program since November, before I ever met her.”

The two connected and immediately felt as though they had known each other forever. Between Tonuah’s courage, positive attitude and strength to push on, and Jeanette’s incredible kindness, self-sacrifice and love, these two incredible women truly are an incredible match.

Following several other hurdles, the kidney transplant surgery was performed on March 28, 2016.

Kidney Donation 2The surgery went well and both Jeanette and Tonuah are recovering, slowly but surely.

“Everything is going well. ‘Leftie,’ as we affectionately call the kidney, started working on cleaning my blood right way,” said Tonuah. “I know it’s a long road ahead, but so far I’m feeling good…Words can’t express how amazing I think our SkyWest family is.”

Jeanette and Tonuah are a great example of SkyWest’s unique culture where 11,000+ employees are continually going out of their way to help and support each other. To learn more about SkyWest and the opportunities that are available to work with people like Jeanette and Tonuah, visit www.skywest.com and check out the career page.

For more information about kidney donation, visit the National Kidney Foundation.

Read more stories about SkyWest people making a difference!

 

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SkyWest Captain Praised for Little Act of Kindness

McKall Morris
Corporate Communications Coordinator

SkyWest people are the best in the industry! Just check out this story that was shared on Facebook after one SkyWest CRJ captain helped a young family with their sleepy toddler.

We landed at midnight and both kids were fast asleep. We waited until we we were the last ones on the plane and woke up…

Posted by Jennifer Braithwaite Cowley on Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Interested in working with incredible people like this captain? Find out more about flying with SkyWest here!

Check out more stories about SkyWest people making a difference!

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SkyWest Mini Indy 2016 Wins Big for Charity

Caitlin Miller
People Programs Coordinator

2016 SkyWest Mini Indy

The engines revved and the checkered flag flew at the Ridgetop Raceway in St. George, Utah as 34 teams from around the globe recently vied for racing fame at the 2016 SkyWest Mini Indy! The airline industry’s premier charity event, Mini Indy includes Indy-style cars racing up to 25 MPH, a finger-lickin’ BBQ pit master’s competition and golf against the scenic backdrop of Southern Utah’s unmatched beauty – all to benefit those in need!

2016 SkyWest Mini Indy

Since its inception 16 years ago, the SkyWest Mini Indy has raised more than $1 million for United Way Dixie. Those donations have helped countless people in need in Southern Utah, with 100 percent of the proceeds staying in the community to help those who are struggling to meet their basic physical and emotional needs.

2016 SkyWest Mini Indy

In conjunction with the event, nearly $50,000 was raised in 2016 to benefit the SkyWest Scholarship Program through the Mini Indy Golf Tournament and a drawing to win a CAN-AM Outlander Max 400 4-wheeler, generously donated by Bombardier. In the last 15 years, the SkyWest Scholarship Program has helped hundreds of SkyWest employees and their family members achieve their higher education and professional goals.

2016 SkyWest Mini Indy

Mini Indy is just one of the many ways SkyWest gives back to the community. To get more information on the excitement and the partners involved in Mini Indy, visit www.miniindy.org.

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Leading Team SkyWest in the Fight Against Parkinson’s

Layne Watson
Corporate Communications Manager

Patrick Altree, a San Francisco-based SkyWest captain, first noticed that something was amiss when his right hand would tremble slightly as he was trying to hold something steady, like pouring a can of soda into a glass. He dismissed it as stress or caffeine since it would come and go. But as the problem began to occur more frequently over the next year, he and his girlfriend (now his wife) started a voyage of self-diagnosis. While all the signs pointed to Parkinson ’s disease, Patrick continued to dismiss the idea.

Patrick went through a series of tests he refers to as the “Parkinson’s Field Sobriety” where a patient is asked to walk, open and close their hands, recite the months of the year backwards, touch their fingers to their nose, etc. Based on the results, Patrick was diagnosed with Young Onset Parkinson’s at the age of 38. Since being diagnosed six and a half years ago, he has refused to sit on the sidelines and has taken an active role in learning more about the disease and is raising funds to bring awareness to and find a cure for Parkinson’s.

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Every April during Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Patrick heads up Team SkyWest in the Paws for Parkinson’s 5k in San Diego. To date, Patrick’s SkyWest team has raised nearly $20,000 for Parkinson’s related research and has become one of the top 10 teams in terms of total money donated.

“The majority of these donations were from individual employees, many whom I’ve never met,” says Patrick. “These are some of the best examples of what the spirit of SkyWest is all about. The generosity and compassion from perfect strangers has been particularly humbling.”

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Parkinson’s patients are often diagnosed when they’re in their 60s. Patrick’s battle with Parkinson’s began when he was in his 30s and illustrates how the disease can affect anyone. Fortunately for Patrick, he responds well to the only FAA-approved treatment using a drug called L-DOPA. This medication, coupled with running and a good diet, has kept Patrick relatively stable.

“Parkinson’s is relentless. It is degenerative, progressive and there is no cure,” says Patrick. “It is all of those things and so much more. Parkinson’s has been a blessing to me. It has taught me the importance of the here and now, the relevance and finite nature of time and that there are things in this world much bigger than myself. It has taught me patience and gratitude, and just how valuable simple kindness is.”

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Patrick’s fundraising efforts support Parkinson’s research, including determining what causes Parkinson’s and how to prevent the disease, developing new treatments and eventually finding a cure.

The next Paws for Parkinson’s 5K will be held on Saturday, April 16 at Liberty Station Park in San Diego, right next to San Diego Lindbergh Field. You can also learn more by visiting Patrick’s team page here.

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How I Became a SkyWest Pilot: Koko Kostelny

McKall Morris
Corporate Communications Coordinator

Miyukiko (Koko) Kostelny, a SkyWest CRJ first officer, knew she wanted to be a pilot ever since she was a young child. And after attending a Women in Aviation Conference, where she met several SkyWest pilots, she knew that she wanted to fly for SkyWest.


How did you decide to become a pilot?

FullSizeRenderGrowing up I was surrounded by military aviation, as my father was an A-6 Navigator in the Marine Corps. My family was stationed mostly overseas, so whenever it was vacation time or we were visiting family, we got to fly on many different airlines and aircraft. I still remember as a little girl going up to the flight deck during flights to Guam on a 737, a 747 to Chicago, or a 777 passing through Hawaii. Sometimes we even flew military standby!

Even as a kid, I vividly remember pilots showing me the flight deck. I collected plastic wings from every airline we flew and always begged my parents to wait so I could sit up in the flight deck and get my picture taken after we landed. What I really loved was seeing female pilots flying on long international hauls because I thought “[I]f they can do that, I can do it one day.”

As a kid, it seemed like a dream job to wake up and fly to/from all of these exotic destinations… all while soaring through the clouds. I couldn’t imagine people got to travel the world as a full-time job!

When I took a discovery flight in high school, it was a no brainer. I was hooked, and I knew that this was going to be my career. I knew I was going to enjoy the thrill of flying, and the ever-changing job environment. No day is the same as many things affect our flying, and I knew I would have satisfaction in flying and connecting passengers to the world, just as the pilots had done for me growing up.

What made you decide to come to SkyWest?

IMG_4749I wanted to be a part of something that was more than just an airline pilot. I wanted to belong to a company where I would truly feel at home; where it was diverse; where I could enjoy flying and have pride in taking our passengers to their destinations. I thought back to when I was an airline passenger and those pilots that showed me the flight deck – I wanted to have pride in my job, company and career. Pilots connected me to the world and I wanted to do the same.

I’ve been fortunate enough to have mentors at SkyWest and they have spoken so highly of the company over the years that I wanted to be a part of it.

When I first met SkyWest pilots, I was a freshman in college attending the Women in Aviation Conference. I was a shy student pilot and went to look at the exhibit booths. It was after the market had crashed, so the conference mood wasn’t the happiest. However, the SkyWest booth was something different. Everyone was still smiling there. I made my way over to the booth so I could talk to them.

I mentioned that, “I’m far from the airlines because just a student pilot, I’m waiting to take my private practical.” I was corrected by a female captain as she told me to have pride in every step of my career. A male pilot working the booth said the same thing. Before I knew it, the pilots were sharing their flight training experiences with me and we talked for a long time. I walked away from the booth with a nice SkyWest CRJ200 model (which is on my bookshelf to this day!), business cards, and a great impression of what could be a future employer. I still remain in contact with those pilots, and I went back to the SkyWest booth every year after that… and now I’m working for SkyWest.

I returned to that booth every year because I enjoyed seeing the friends and mentors I met my first year, and because I enjoyed meeting new SkyWest pilots every year.  As the years progressed, I knew I wanted to be at SkyWest. The company attracted me so much because of the great personalities of their employees. When flying on SkyWest flights in college, I saw pilots and flight attendants go out of their way to make the passengers’ flight more enjoyable. Seeing the pilots jump out of the flight deck to help the elderly even on a quick turn tells me that they aren’t here just to fly the plane. That’s the kind of co-workers I want to be surrounded with, and I’m so lucky to have that now.

What do people say when you tell them you’re a pilot?

Usually people are impressed! I get asked how young I am, or how I became a pilot.

One of the things I get the most is marveled eyes with, “But you don’t look like a pilot!” I then often ask them, “Well, what does a pilot look like?” Their response is usually laughter and something along the lines of, “Well, I didn’t expect a young, cheerful girl wearing lipstick!”

Sometimes people ask me if I’m really a pilot (even in my uniform!) or “Can girls really be pilots?” and that saddens me because that shows that some people out there still don’t have a good concept of female pilots, but it’s a rare occasion… that stigma is changing with the increasing number of female pilots!

On my last trip, I had an older Spanish-speaking man who needed help finding his gate. After I helped him look at the gate information, he paused to look at me up and down. He asked me what I did, so I told him that I was a pilot. He was so ecstatic to meet a female pilot that he proceeded to hug me and kiss me on the cheek! It took me by surprise, but he told me to always keep my chin high. He was a military pilot in his country, and he never worked with female pilots but thought it was so neat to meet one.

What advice would you give to women who are considering becoming pilots?

Get out to your nearest airport and take a discovery flight!  The next time you fly on an airline, ask the pilots to see the flight deck! You never know what might spark your interest. Have curiosity, and ask the pilots questions. If you want to be a pilot, don’t be shy about it. I’ve done many Girl Scout Aviation Merit Badge seminars with The Ninety-Nines, and so many girls are shy about liking airplanes, math or science. I think it’s wonderful to be engaged in those subjects. Know that flying is for boys and girls!

IMG_5197Just this past weekend, I had my first all-female crew. I was excited because it had only been a month of flying with SkyWest. On one of the turns, we had a mother and her daughter visit the flight deck. Although that family flew a lot, they had never seen a female pilot… let alone an all-female crew! The little girl walked up to the flight deck, pushed by her mother. She was shy, but said hi. After asking us what some of the buttons and switches did, she asked, “Why are you the first girl pilots I met?” I didn’t know what to say… but then after getting plastic wings she whispered, “I want to be a pilot too, so I can look pretty and see the clouds every day.” My heart was instantly warmed and I saw myself in that girl.

There are many resources now that can help with females in their journey of becoming a pilot. I am a member of Women in Aviation and The Ninety-Nines, both great organizations that have helped me become who I am. These two organizations are wonderful ways to get involved in aviation not only for friendship, but for mentoring, scholarships, memories and more. Through these organizations I’ve made great friends that each advanced in their own field of aviation. I’ve been fortunate to receive scholarships for flight training as well. There are opportunities for all levels, from student pilots to type ratings!

These organizations also have top notch mentoring programs built into them. I was a part of them as a college student, and now I’m the one giving advice to younger girls! Sometimes I find it hard to believe, but then I know that I made it where I am today because of others that helped me.


SkyWest supports Women in Aviation and will be attending the 2016 Conference March 10-12. The pilot recruiting team will also be holding on-site interviews for those who are ready to take their career to new heights. Learn more about flying at SkyWest and apply today by visiting www.skywest.com.

Check out this blog post featuring SkyWest Captains, Mary Conti, Suzy Garrett, and Jen Johnson. Not only have they realized their dream of flying, but they continue to set an example for other young women and girls to follow.

Jen Johnson with an all-female crew on a recent flight.

SkyWest Pilots Help More Women Lean Into Aviation

McKall Morris
Corporate Communications Coordinator

It’s becoming more and more common to see women flying commercial aircraft, thanks in part to those like Mary Conti, Suzy Garrett, Jen Johnson and many others at SkyWest. Not only have they realized their dream of flying, but they continue to set an example for other young women and girls to follow.

Jen Johnson with an all-female crew on a recent flight.

Captain Jen Johnson with her crew on a recent flight.

Mary Conti
CRJ Captain based in Palm Springs, California
Hired in 1985, Mary is one of SkyWest’s first female captains.

Mary, when did you decide to become a pilot and how did you end up flying for SkyWest?

Mary: When I was 23, I became a pilot for my personal use, because no one hired female pilots (in 1976). I owned my own airplane, and when I finished my bachelor’s degree, I did some instructing. That led to a job selling airplanes, which led to a corporate job. I ended up flying tours out of Moab, Utah which then led me to flying for SkyWest. 

Obviously, there have been some changes in the industry since you began. What have you seen change?

Mary: There are so many more females in aviation now! Only a few airlines were hiring female pilots when I started here. I was one of the first two female captains SkyWest had! There just weren’t many of us, but as more females started applying to be pilots, the entire industry has changed. 

Any advice for women who are considering an aviation career?

Mary: I am so happy with my career choice. I would never trade it. I love flying. I love being out flying even on the more challenging days that test my skills. I think it’s the love of flying that brings pilots in, male or female. So my only advice is, if you have a real love for flying, do it!

And there are real opportunities here at SkyWest. We have really good bases for people. As far as regionals go, SkyWest is the best. It’s a place where people want to stay. A lot of people, like me, come thinking that it’ll just be a starting place and they realize they love it! The company is strong. We’ve lasted all this time. I’ve seen so many other regionals go upside down or go away completely, but SkyWest is a good, stable company. We have a great reputation with our partners. I don’t think SkyWest will be going away any time soon. And above all, no one treats their people as good as SkyWest does.

Suzy Garrett with her family at the Great Wall of China.

Captain Suzy Garrett with her family at the Great Wall of China.

Suzy Garrett
CRJ Captain based in Los Angeles, California
Suzy was the 11th female pilot hired at SkyWest.

Hi Suzy! So, when did you KNOW you wanted to be a pilot?

Suzy: In 8th grade. I was flying out of Phoenix and it was a beautiful day. There were puffy white clouds and blue skies, and I knew right then that I wanted to fly for a living.

 Why do you love being a pilot?

Suzy: The variety of my days; I’m not just in an office.

 What makes SkyWest a good choice for a pilot?

Suzy: Well, my husband is also a pilot and he flew for SkyWest too! We have three kids and I couldn’t have asked for a better fit for our family. I was really able to have my cake and eat it too. Here at SkyWest, I was able to be senior faster and hold a line that worked for my life and my family life. SkyWest made it really easy to tailor my schedule. Having so many domiciles also makes it great!

Plus it’s a great company. It’s really fantastic! I never have worried about being furloughed or the company’s stability. I can count on SkyWest to be reliable. Those looking at choosing which regional to fly at should consider that portion! Don’t just look at the regionals as a quick stepping stone. You want a stable company no matter how long you plan to be there. Choose somewhere that is going to be a strong, stable company.

What other advice would you give someone who is looking at becoming a pilot?

Suzy: Number one would be, don’t take no for an answer and don’t give up. When I first started out to become a pilot, the military was the main path. I’m only 5’1” and the military and the major airlines had height requirements for their pilots. Everyone told me I should just quit, but I kept with it and soon the height requirements went away! Also, back then, there weren’t women pilots. There is a stereotype of who a pilot is and what they look like, but don’t believe it! Just go for it. You don’t have to be a John Wayne character to fly a plane! Don’t let anyone convince you otherwise!

Jen Johnson
ERJ Captain based in Denver, Colorado
Joined SkyWest nearly 13 years ago.

Jen, when did you decide you wanted to be a pilot?

Jen: All I ever thought about was being a pilot. My dad and I flew in a 172 that belonged to one of his friends and I loved it. My dad got sick, but I knew it was for me. There still is nothing else I could see myself doing.

What three words would you use to describe your time flying for SkyWest?

Jen: I love it. I’ve been here 12 years. I’m a check airman on the E175, and I just love it here. I love where we fly. I love the people I work with.

What do you enjoy most about being at SkyWest?

Jen: The comradery here is great. It’s like a family. You know each other and remember each other, and there is a family feeling and people care about each other from the chief pilot down.

Any advice for women considering a career as a pilot?

Jen: You can do it! It’s a male-dominated field, but there’s no good reason you can’t do it. I suggest that you go fly! Once you get in the air one time, and the flying bug bites you (if it bites you like it did me) you’ll be hooked. Go out and try it!

How have you seen the role of women in aviation change since you began?

Jen: When I was a new hire here, 12 ½ years ago, I might have flown with another female pilot once during the year. I fly with a lot more female first officers now. There’s not a ton – it’s still an exciting thing when I get an all-female crew – but it feels like there are a lot more coming, and that’s a good thing.

SkyWest Airlines is home to more than 11,000 of the best professionals in the airline industry. Those who are ready to pursue their dream of flying should apply online at www.skywest.com today!

SkyWest is also proud to work with groups like Women in Aviation International to help advance the role of women in aviation and will be attending the 27th annual conference in Nashville, Tennessee March 10-12, 2016. Learn more at www.wai.org.

And check out our blog highlighting one of our new CRJ First Officers who, after attending a Women in Aviation Conference, she knew that she wanted to fly for SkyWest.

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Become a SkyWest Flight Attendant

McKall Morris
Corporate Communications Coordinator

SkyWest flight attendants are part of an exciting team of professionals who love working in the travel industry and sharing their enthusiasm with passengers. This is a dynamic and exciting position that allows you to travel, meet new challenges, and be invigorated every day as you portray the essence of SkyWest to our customers!

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“Layla and I love flying together. It’s always a lot of fun!” – Mary Deperrot, Chicago-based flight attendant.

Those who are ready to become a SkyWest flight attendant may submit an application today and attend a  flight attendant interview at any one of the following locations in March:

  • March 1 in Minneapolis, Minneapolis
  • March 2 in La Crosse, Wisconsin
  • March 2 in Fargo, North Dakota
  • March 3 in Eugene, Oregon
  • March 3 in Portland, Oregon
  • March 7 in Orlando, Florida
  • March 8 in Colorado Spring, Colorado
  • March 8 in Dallas, Texas
  • March 9 in Santa Barbara, California
  • March 9 in Houston, Texas
  • March 10 in San Francisco, California
  • March 10 in Memphis, Tennessee
  • March 15 in Seattle, Washington
  • March 15 in Charlotte, North Carolina
  • March 16 in Chicago, Illinois
  • March 16 in Aurora, Colorado
  • March 17 in Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • March 17 in Atlanta, Georgia
  • March 22 in San Antonio, Texas
  • March 23 in Madison, Wisconsin
  • March 24 in Salt Lake City, Utah
  • March 24 in Los Angeles, California
  • March 29 in St. Louis, Missouri
  • March 29 in Asheville, North Carolina
  • March 30 in Kansas City, Missouri
  • March 30 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota
  • March 31 in Rogers, Arkansas
  • March 31 in Lincoln, Nebraska

Click here for more information about each of these events. Please note that the dates and locations of events may change without notice.

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Love is in the Air

McKall Morris
Corporate Communications Coordinator

Valentine’s Day is all about sharing love. So we asked some of our pilots to share why they love to fly for SkyWest.

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I love flying in the most beautiful area in the country for the best people in the business.

– Joe Becker – CRJ Captain, PDX

I do what I love for a living every day surrounded by people who genuinely love their jobs.

-Ryan Fisher – ERJ Captain, ORD

I can honestly say I work with the best in the industry and absolutely love going to work. The people at SkyWest really do care about what they do and have fun doing it. You are able to learn and gain experience from some of the best in the industry. 

-Brandon Falzon – CRJ First Officer, SFO

Maybe this…12466215_930116230391170_4698473916389768435_o

-Roy Madewell – CRJ First Officer, PSP

It’s wonderful being able to say that I truly love going to “work”! We have such wonderful people! 

-Sarah Bliesath – CRJ Captain, SEA

I love that when I sit down in the flight deck, it is assumed that the guy or girl next to me is already a friend whether I have met them before or not. That is the SkyWest culture.

 -Matthew S. Schroeder – CRJ Captain, SLC

These are my top two reasons that I enjoy flying for SkyWest:

1) The People-
Despite SkyWest’s rapid growth, each base still has the feel of a small family. We all take care of one another and genuinely care about each other’s lives outside the company, and it’s really a great feeling.

2) The Flying-   
SkyWest has an awesome and varied mix of flying all throughout the country. Whether you enjoy flying in the mountains of Colorado, the exotic cities in Mexico or the busy airspace in New York, there’s a diverse and exciting mix of flying and destinations!  

-Mike Edmonds – CRJ First Officer, PHX

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SkyWest is home to more than 11,300 aviation professionals who love what they do! And now is the perfect time to become a part of our team!

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SkyWest Flight Attendant Interviews in a City Near You!

McKall Morris
Corporate Communications Coordinator

SkyWest flight attendants enjoy an exciting and dynamic career. Not only are they able to travel to hundreds of cities across the U.S., Canada, Mexico and the Bahamas, they also have the opportunity to meet new people and take on new challenges every day. Of course, their most important responsibility is to ensure the safety of each passenger onboard more than 1,700 daily flights.

This is no ordinary job. It’s a chance to be a part of an incredible team that’s continually going above and beyond to provide the best service in the industry.GreatByChoice_0193

Those who are ready to launch their SkyWest career may submit an application today and attend a SkyWest flight attendant interview at any one of the following convenient locations in February:

  • Feb. 2 in Sacramento, California
  • Feb. 2 in Minot, North Dakota
  • Feb. 3 in Spokane, Washington
  • Feb. 4 in Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Feb. 8 in Detroit, Michigan
  • Feb. 9 in San Jose, California
  • Feb. 9 in Alpena, Michigan
  • Feb. 10 in Santa Ana, California
  • Feb. 11 in Tucson, Arizona
  • Feb. 15 in Helena, Montana
  • Feb. 16 in Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Feb. 17 in Aurora, Colorado
  • Feb. 18 in Chicago, Illinois
  • Feb. 22 in Fresno, California
  • Feb. 23 in Boise, Idaho
  • Feb. 24 in Nashville, Tennessee
  • Feb. 25 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Feb. 29 in Las Vegas, Nevada

Click here for more information about each of these events. Please note that the dates and locations of events may change without notice.